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How to Plant and Care for Herbs

Planting Herbs:
Herbs need to be treated like babies, so use a delicate touch when planting and transplanting. Always be careful not to hurt the roots. Never put an herb into a pot that is too large.
 
Watering Herbs:
Water is the number one killer of herbs! Never use a hose or faucet to water herbs. A small watering can without a diffuser is best. Remember to be gentle.
 
Using your Herbs:
Herbs are happiest when they are being picked often, it keeps them growing. Herb plants that are not used often get woody and can go to seed.
 
Light Requirements:
Herbs need good light to grow. If you don’t have good natural light, invest in a plant light. 
 
Fertilizing:
You are what you eat! We suggest you use an all-natural organic fertilizer. Be careful to not over-fertilize – it will kill the plant. Following the instructions on the package is best.
 
Types of Herbs:
Perennial: Comes back every year.  Perennial herbs tend to get woody stems over time.
Tender Perennial:  May or may not survive winter in our area.  Can be put outside in pots in Spring and Summer and brought back inside for Fall and Winter. They can be grown in protected areas or near house and mulched well in winter.  Usually if it survives its first winter it is perennial.  A lot of tender perennials must be brought inside for winter.
 
Biennial:  Lives and grows for 2 years. The first year it produces foliage.  The second year it produces fruit and/or flowers.  Then it dies.
 
Annual:  Grow in one season. After the season is over they die. Most herbs will do best indoors if given a well-lit location away from cold drafts and heating vents. Visibility is important too!  Placing herbs where you will see them means you will probably use them more often.
 
If possible keep perennial herbs in pots outside for winter.  Place them in garage or near foundation of house and they will probably survive in the pots.
 
Remember:
Use your herbs often and when they start looking sickly, discard them and get a new herb.  It doesn’t mean you have failed as a gardener.
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